Analysis by the BBC has revealed that four in 10 private employers who have published their latest gender pay gap figures are reporting a wider gap than they did last year.

Gender Pay Gap reporting involves comparing the difference between the middle ranking woman’s earnings and the middle ranking man’s earning. This is different to paying men and women differently because they do the same or similar work – that is equal pay.

Based on the median hourly pay gap figure, the BBC found that employers in every sector pay men more on average. Companies which have reported a widening pay gap this year include Kwik Fit, Npower and Virgin Atlantic.

With around six weeks to go until the deadline for the second round of gender pay gap reporting, only about 10% have published their figures for 2018.

Of the 1,146 that  reported so far, the median gender pay gap is 8.4%, a slight improvement on the previous figure of 9.7%.

  • 74% report a pay gap favouring men
  • 14% have a pay gap favouring women
  • 12% report no pay gap

Who are the worst offenders?

One of the worst performing sectors is financial services, where several banks including Lloyds Banking Group and RBS have reported median gender pay gaps in excess of 30%. Construction also has a high median gender pay gap of around 26%, according to the BBC’s figures.

Last week a report by Paygaps.com revealed that almost a third of organisations that have submitted their reports so far with errors.

Mistakes included not having the report signed by someone without the correct level of authority, and not including a link to a written report.

At least two employers reported a gender pay gap of above 100% – which is mathematically impossible (unless the women are paying their employers to work)

Read more about:

Gender Pay Gap reporting errors. 

Gender Pay Gap – the American Way.

Help with Gender Pay Gap Reporting here. 

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